A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Abbey Court
Agincourt Street
Airlie Crescent
Amity Court
Annabelle Street
Archer Court
Arlington Court
Artunga Place

Ballinger Place
Balonne Lane
Bancroft Street
Barcoo Lane
Bellanboe Circuit
Bells Esplanade
Bledisloe Boulevard
Boat Shed Way
Bond Street
Bongaree Drive
Botany Drive
Brennan Lane
Bulloo Lane
Bulwer Drive
Burdekin Place

Caldwell Street
Campbellville Circuit
Carnell Street
Carr Place
Catherine Street
Columba Place
Comet Street
Condamine Court
Coral Sea Drive
Cowiebank Place
Creek View Place

Deep Water Cct
Delisser Place
Durundur Street

Agincourt Street

Thomas Martin Tripcony (1828 – 1896) sailor, shearer, oysterman was born in Cornwall, England. He served in the Royal Navy during the Crimean War and later joined the merchant marine. When serving in the ship ” Agincourt” he arrived in Melbourne in 1859, obtained a discharge and went to the goldfields, but failed to make a fortune. He next tried shearing and worked his way to Brisbane where he was employed on the construction of the Normal School.

In Brisbane in 1861, he married Catherine Buchanan (1835 – 1903) and went to work for Captain Whish on his sugar plantation on the Caboolture River plain.

From Caboolture he moved on to Deception Bay, lime-burning for James Campbell and Sons, and moved from there to Toorbul Point and finally to Cowiebank, where he obtained an oyster licence and took up land and settled for the remainder of his life – oystering. He died in 1896.

Amity Court

John Oxley (1785 – 1828) surveyor-general and explorer was born at Kirkham, Yorkshire. He joined the navy in 1799 and sailed to Australia late in 1801 in “H.M.S. Buffalo” as master’s mate, arriving in October 1802, where he was first engaged in coastal survey work.

He retired from the navy in 1811 and took up his appointment as Surveyor- General of New South Wales in 1812. In 1823 he sailed as far north as Port Curtis and on his return voyage put into Moreton Bay and with the assistance of the ticket-of-leave castaway John Finnegan, discovered the Brisbane River. On his return to Sydney he recommended Moreton Bay as a suitable site for another penal settlement.

In 1824 John Oxley arrived in Moreton Bay in the Government brig “Amity” to select the site for the Penal Settlement. The Surveyor-General Oxley laid out the first Penal Settlement at Redcliffe.

Annabelle Street

The Allen-Waters family ran “Caloundra House”, which operated for 25 years after being built in 1924. Ken Allen-Waters was well known on the coast, picking up guests from Landsborough train station and providing them with tours in his big Hudson named Annabelle and, later, in his Oldsmobile named Valerie.

Archer Court

David, John and Alexander Archer were three of the nine Archer brothers who spent some time in Australia. They were sons of William Archer of Perth, Scotland, who moved to Norway in 1825.

David (1816 – 1900) came to Australia in 1834. John (1814 – 1857) was a later arrival, having first gone to sea. David and John, with another brother Thomas, took up Durundur Station on the Stanley River.

Alexander (1828 – 1890) did not come to Australia until 1852, spending all his life here with the Bank of New South Wales. Both he and his wife lost their lives in the wreck of the Quetta in February 1890.

The Archer brothers played very prominent roles in Queensland development; pioneering the pastoral industry; in politics Archibald was M.L.A. and held portfolios of Treasury and Education, Thomas was Agent-General for Queensland in London and Colin obtained a much wider distinction as ship- designer and builder, having built the “Fram” the ship in which Nansen explored the North Polar Sea in 1893.

Artunga Place

Artunga means “deep water hole” in the dialect of the Aborigines of the Oman-oma region.  It is the name of a sheep and cattle property, which produces traprock wool, fat lambs and cattle.

Ballinger Place

Charles Ballinger, a Crown Land Ranger, was the first landowner in Caloundra proper, purchasing in ca.1868 the land comprising what is now the central business area of Caloundra. Ballinger never occupied the land (Portion 12), instead growing and crushing cane on his other land near the Mooloolah River inland from Currimundi Lake (Portion 1).

In November 1875 Ballinger sold the land parcel – 277 acres, 1 rood and 32 perches – to Mr. Robert Bulcock for the sum of $70.15

Bancroft Street

Dr Thomas Lane Bancroft (1860 – 1933) scientist was born at Nottingham, England, the son of Joseph Bancroft, a leading scientist of his time who took an active part in all medical and scientific associations in Queensland. The Bancroft family migrated to Queensland in 1864.

Thomas Lane Bancroft was educated at the Brisbane Grammar School and the University of Edinburgh where he graduated in medicine in 1883. As his father had done before him, he combined a medical practice with scientific research and gained international recognition for his studies of the Queensland lungfish.

He also discovered that a species of mosquito was the carrier of dengue fever. Another interest was in the hybridization of plants developing new kinds of peach, grape, castor-oil plant and cotton.

He died at Wallaville, Queensland in 1933.

Bellanboe Circuit

Bellanboe is the name of a property near Tenterfield.  It is derived from the old bullock teams – the front bullock wore a bell and yolk across its neck – hence ‘bell/an/boe’.

Bledisloe Boulevard

Bledisloe Cup – The Australian Wallabies contested the Bledisloe Cup in 1998 and used Caloundra as their base camp. The Bledisloe Cup, the Wallabies won after they had beaten the All Blacks in Christchurch on 1st August 1998, is known by rugby fans across the world by sight. The Bledisloe Cup personifies trans-Tasman rugby between Australia’s Wallabies and New Zealand’s All Blacks.

It was first contested in 1931 when Lord Bledisloe, New Zealand’s Governor-General, donated the trophy. It stands at a metre high, has two handles that are outward like two wings, a lid and has a coating of pure silver.

The Australian Rugby Team was based here in Golden Beach when they won the Bledisloe Cup. While based here they also won the World Cup, Cook Cup, Hopetoun Cup, Mandela Cup, Landsdowne Cup and Trophee Des Bicentenaries by defeating Ireland, England, Wales, New Zealand, South Africa, Romania, France and USA.

Bongaree Drive

Bongaree was a Broken Bay Aborigine who was chosen by Matthew Flinders to accompany him, not only in the “Norfolk” to Moreton Bay, but also in the “Investigator” in 1801-1802 on the circumnavigation of the Australian continent.

Various governors and colonels gave Bongaree uniforms and a cocked hat, in which garb he lived and slept. He spoke English well and was noted for his acute sense of humour.

Bongaree died on 24th November 1830, and was buried at Rose Bay. His portrait by Rodius hangs in the Public Library of New South Wales.

Botany Drive

Having first sighted the eastern coast of Australia on 20 April 1770, Lt. James Cook and his ship Endeavour continued northward. On 28 April, Cook resolved to sail into “a bay which appeared to be tolerably well sheltered from all winds”. Noting in his journal the “great quantity of new plants” collected by botanists Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander, Cook later renamed the place he initially called “Sting-Ray Harbour” as “Botany Bay”.

Following extensive investigations of the locality, the Endeavour headed northward again, exploring the (now) New South Wales and Queensland coast, sighting what Cook called the “Glass Houses” on 17 May 1770.

Campbellville Circuit

In 1881, James Campbell & Sons established a sawmill by Coochin Creek, about four miles (6 km) upstream from where it enters the Passage. This grew into a settlement named ” Campbellville“.

From the beginning of the mill’s operation, until early 1883, the timber was transported from Campbellville to Brisbane by sailing cutter, then a paddle steamer named “Mavis”, which had been especially built for James Campbell’s use in the Passage operation of their business, began trading on Australia Day in 1883 and remained in service until the mill closed down in 1890.

Carnell Street

The Carnell brothers of Obi Obi and Maleny, William, Pritchard and Stanley, served with 42nd, 49th and 12th Battalions respectively on the Western Front during the First World War. Stanley was the only one to return from the War, decorated with the Military Medal for “great courage and utter disregard of personal safety” in attending, during an action in late August 1918, to wounded members of this company whilst under heavy machine gun fire. Sadly, Pritchard had been killed in action, also in France, just one week earlier, whilst William had been killed in Belgium in July 1917. Their story is testament to the devastating effects that “the war to end all wars” had on small communities throughout Australia.

Columba Place

Columba is the name of a sheep and cattle property once owned by Roy Henzell. It is in the Oman-oma region.

Coral Sea Drive

The Coral Sea is a marginal sea of the South Pacific and extends 2,000 kilometres down the Australian northeast coast including Caloundra.

Cowiebank Place

Thomas Tripcony (1828 – 1896), sailor, shearer, oysterman was born in Cornwall, England. He served in the Royal Navy during the Crimean War and later joined the merchant marine. Whilst serving on the ship “Agincourt” he arrived in Melbourne in 1859, obtained a discharge and went to the goldfields, but failed to make a fortune. He next tried shearing and worked his way to Brisbane where he was employed on the construction of the normal school.

He moved from place to place between Brisbane and Deception Bay and from there to “Cowiebank“. Thomas settled on Pumice Stone Channel, on the northern side of the mouth of Glass Mountain Creek in 1861. He named his home ” Cowie Bank” after a farm of the same name in Stirlingshire, Scotland, the birthplace of his wife. Where he obtained an oyster licence and took up land and settled for the remainder of his life – oystering. He died in 1896.

Delisser Place

Alfred Delisser was born in Middlesex England in 1832, the son of a Doctor. Delisser came to Australia about 1857 and worked in South Australia, Western Australia and Victoria before proceeding to Queensland in 1876. He carried out Crown land and freehold surveys, mainly in the counties of Canning, Stanley and Cavendish. He surveyed in the county of Canning in 1881, in particular, portion 27, Parish of Bribie, now known as Pelican Waters. A tree that Alfred made a blaze mark on in 1881 still stands at Pelican Waters.

Surveying ran in the family, as Alfred’s brother, E A Delisser, was also a surveyor registered in Queensland. E A Delisser was in charge of the survey party that surveyed through the Nullarbor Plain in 1866. Alfred was a member of that survey party. Alfred Delisser was married and had five children. He died in Brisbane in 1904.

Durundur Street

David, John and Alexander Archer were three of the nine Archer brothers who spent some time in Australia. They were sons of William Archer of Perth, Scotland, who moved to Norway in 1825.

David (1816 – 1900) came to Australia in 1834. John (1814 – 1857) was a later arrival, having first gone to sea. David and John, with another brother Thomas, took up Durundur Station on the Stanley River.

Alexander (1828 – 1890) did not come to Australia until 1852, spending all his life here with the Bank of New South Wales. Both he and his wife lost their lives in the wreck of the Quetta in February 1890.

The Archer brothers played very prominent roles in Queensland development; pioneering the pastoral industry; in politics Archibald was M.L.A. and held portfolios of Treasury and Education, Thomas was Agent-General for Queensland in London and Colin obtained a much wider distinction as ship- designer and builder, having built the “Fram” the ship in which Nansen explored the North Polar Sea in 1893.

Edlundh Court

Mr. Walderman Edlundh was Caloundra’s first lighthouse keeper. This lighthouse was built in 1898 on Canberra Terrace. Back then it stood together with Edlundh’s house (which also served as a post office and school) in a lighthouse reserve of 35 acres.

The Edlundh children, of whom there were 9, figured prominently in Caloundra’s early school roles. The Caloundra Primary School was built on the corner of Queen Street and Regent Street in 1915. The first pupil was William Walter Burnett Edlundh, followed soon after by siblings Charlie, Dora, Irene and Erick. One of the first teachers was a Miss M Costello – later Mrs. Miriam Westaway.

Edwardson Drive

William Edwardson was Confidential Clerk in the Commissariat Department in Sydney when placed in command of HM Cutter “Snapper” and sent to explore the coast north of latitude 28o 30S. In June 1822, he entered Moreton Bay; he examined Pumicestone Channel for almost its entire length and the channels at the southern end of the bay as far as what is no Jumpinpin.

Edwardson’s brief account of his experience in the waterway:

“The Ship’s channel into this place, the only possible one to get through, lies close to the Beach of Point Skirmish and has four fathoms at Low Water.

The Natives are too numerous to risk a landing except on the Islands. Taking a view of this place (Moreton Bay), it is my Humble opinion extremely dangerous for even the smallest vessels to enter, and except in the Pumicestone River does not afford the least Shelter or safe anchorage.”

On leaving Moreton Bay, Edwardson proceeded to Hervey Bay and proved Fraser Island to be an island. He died in Sydney in 1826.

Eipper Street

The Reverend Christopher Eipper was one of the missionaries from the German Mission at Zion’s Hill near Brisbane Town who were the first to attempt to convert the “pagans” of the Passage to Christianity. These were the first missionaries to have an acquaintance with the Passage blacks.

This community settled just a few kilometres to the north of early Brisbane in 1838. The clerical missionary the Rev. Christopher Eipper who had been educated at the Missionary College at Basle in Switzerland and ordained by the German and French Protestant clergy in London, has left very detailed, sympathetic accounts of the Aborigines, through which we can see the early influences on them of European culture.

Much of what Rev. Christopher Eipper recounted about the Aborigines was very general in the sense that it did not relate to specific tribes and some of it contradicted with what had been written earlier which may simply have been reflecting the changes that had already taken place in their own culture after fifteen years of association with whites.

Elimbah Street

Elimbah: “Place of grey snakes”

John Mathew M.A., B.D. an academic anthropologist, lived in Kabi territory as a teenage youth for more than six consecutive years. He visited the tribe periodically afterwards and spoke their language as a “second mother-tongue” he knew many Aboriginal tribes and made a lifelong study of their lore and their laws. He set the boundaries of the Kabi tribe from the Burrum River in the north to the middle of the Passage in the south, and from the coast over the coastal ranges to the Burnett River in the west, including Fraser Island but not pragmatically including Bribie Island.

He called the smaller groups of families within the tribal area “communities” and quotes a number of instances where other workers in his field gave tribal names within the Kabi territory as such. He stated that there seemed to be more communities among the Kabi people then in any other tribe, which may account for later tribal names and boundaries.

And from the Kabi community came the word Elimbah meaning “Place of grey snakes“. “yilam” means the grey snake and “ba” means place. This is believed to have been the Aboriginal name for the hill now known officially as “The Saddleback”. Elimbah is the official name of a town, railway station and a creek.

Endeavour Crescent

In 1768 Lt. James Cook was awarded command of H.M.B Endeavour and of the expedition to Tahiti to observe 1769’s transit of Venus across the sun. It was on this voyage (1768-1771) that Cook mapped, landed on and claimed, in the name of King George III, the entire eastern part of the Australian continent.

On 17 May 1770, Cook sailed northwards along what is now known as the Sunshine Coast, noting the following in his journal:

“… this place may always be found by three hills which lay … in the Latitude of 26o 53’S … (and) are very remarkable on account of their singular form of elevation which very much resemble glass houses which occasioned me giving them that name …”

Finnegan Place

Richard Parsons, Thomas Pamphlet and John Finnegan were ticket-of-leave convicts who were travelling south from Sydney to the Illawarra district to buy cedar, when they were caught in a storm and eventually wrecked on the shore of Moreton Island in 1823.

They spent five months travelling by canoe up the Brisbane River (un-named at the time), and then to Bribie Island where the Aborigines supplied them with fish and showed them how to dig for, treat and cook fern roots.

After a time, anxious to get back to Sydney, they set off north again, but Pamphlet and Finnegan returned and Parsons kept going. Two months later in November of the year of 1823, Pamphlet and Finnegan were rescued by John Oxley in the “Mermaid”. Parsons had to wait another year for his rescue, until Oxley returned.

Firefly Street

William Landsborough (1825 – 1886) was born at Stevenston, near Saltcoats, Ayshire into a well-known family of naturalists. He migrated to New South Wales in 1841 to join two of his brothers in New England. By 1850 he had become an expert bushman, taking up his own property with a partner, which he did not hesitate to leave for Australia’s gold rush.

In 1854 his years of exploration began, with his own station on the Burnett as base. One of his co-explorers was Nat Buchanan, the first of the famous overlanders. He was continually exploring for new pastures which he would take up on lease for himself and his friends. With this experience behind him it was only natural that he should be chosen to lead an expedition in search of the lost explorers Burke and Wills in 1861.

Landsborough left Moreton Bay in August 1861 in the ” Firefly”accompanied by the ” Victoria”. The “Firefly” was wrecked on a reef near Cape York with the loss of five of the thirty horses on board, but was re-floated by the ” Victoria” and repaired, and the party landed safely at the mouth of the Albert River.

Landsborough’s first sortie out in search of the lost explorers was responsible for discovering the Barkly Tableland. Not having sighted Burke and Wills they returned to the depot, obtained more stores and set off again. Travelling south- east this time, following the Flinders River upstream, then the Thomson, Barcoo and Warrego Rivers downstream until they reached the first settlement where they heard of the fate of the lost explorers. They had crossed their tracks without having been aware of it.

Flitcroft Place

On 16 August 1917 “The Bulcock Estate”, comprised of “404 Superb Seaview Sites”, was made available for sale by agents Isles, Love and Co. of Brisbane. In the centre of the land sat Robert Bulcock’s estate (although Bulcock himself died in 1900). Many of the street names allocated at that time have prevailed to this day. Others, however, fell by the wayside: Flitcroft Terrace became Omrah Avenue; Ferris Avenue became Tay Ave; Burgess Terrace became Maloja Avenue.

Forster Place

Following the withdrawal of Joseph Banks, Johann Reinhold (Reinhold) Forster and his son Johann George Adam (George) Forster served as the appointed naturalists aboard the ship Resolution for Cook’s second voyage of discovery (1772-1775).

They made detailed observations of the natural histories and cultures of the islands they visited and made extensive collections of both natural history specimens and ethnographic artifacts. Many items collected by the Forsters can today be found in the Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford.

Fortier Street

The Fortier brothers, Driver Alan David Fortier (age 25) and Private Frederick Lewis Fortier (age 29) were both lost in the attack on the Australian Hospital Ship Centaur off Moreton Island on 14 May 1943, which claimed the lives of all but 64 of the 322 personnel aboard.

This street is dedicated to the memory of the Fortier brothers and all those lost in the Centaur tragedy, whose names are recorded on the Centaur Memorial, Wickham Point, Caloundra.

Francis Court

The Francis Hotel was the first hotel in Caloundra, built (and still standing) on the corner of Stewart Way and Albert Street, Shelly Beach. It was built in 1906 for Mr. David Rooke, and named after his son Francis. Mr. Rooke collected hotel visitors from Landsborough rail station in his three-horse buckboard, and later by car. The hotel was modernised in 1916, and continued trading into the 1950s, at which time its license was transferred to the Caloundra Hotel. The Francis Hotel had one of the first telephones in town, connected in 1912, with the telephone number of “Caloundra 2”.

Gilingham Place

John Bingle (1796-1882) was born at Gillingham, Kent. After working in a naval dockyard, he joined the merchant marine and sailed for Australia in 1821.

Within a month of his arrival in Sydney he was commissioned by Governor Brisbane to survey the coast as far north as Moreton Bay and explore for rivers, which he did in the cutter “Sally” entering Moreton Bay on 5th March 1822. While he did not find a river in Moreton Bay, he did find almost conclusively that Flinders’ Pumicestone River was not a river but a strait.

He was commended for his efforts and given permission to build a vessel for trading to Newcastle. As Bingle & Co. he established a regular trading service between Sydney and Newcastle, carrying coal, cedar and merchandise.

Godwin Place 

Fishing, both professional and amateur has always been a feature of life on the Passage. So bountiful were the supplies in the early days of settlement, several fish canneries were established at different times and in different places between the late 1890s and 1914.

The first of these were at ” Toorbul Point”, a business owned by Messrs. James Clark and Reginald Hockings. This was sold to Charles Godwin in 1899 and shifted to the northern tip of Bribie soon afterwards. While it was still in operation, Maloney Bros. erected a second cannery right alongside it in 1906. The following year Godwin sold out to Lionel Landsborough, son of William Landsborough.

In 1910 it changed ownership again having been bought by Mrs Sarah Balls, who shifted it back to the southern end of the island, opposite to where it was originally established. It was operating there until 1914.

Toorbul came from the name of a locality group of the Yugarabul nation. This group inhabited the area covered by the present cities of Brisbane and Redcliffe, the Shire of Pine Rivers and part of Caloundra Shire. From Yugarabul “tar/au” meaning loose stones and “bul” meaning a population group or subdivision. Toorbul Point marked Yugarabul nation’s limit of their territory.

The idea of Toorbul Point being used as a port appears a quite few times in the mid 1800s. First Dr Lang, then Alexander Archer, later William Landsborough and then during the Second World War by the United States Defense Forces who investigated Toorbul Point as a possible site for a port because they were frustrated by the tedious four-hour journey from the entrance to Moreton Bay to the wharves in Brisbane.

Grace Court

Evan and Grace Clarke and their 9 children settled on the shores of Pumicestone Passage in 1922 where they built Caloundra’s first Ice works, founding a year-round commercial fishing industry and providing much needed ice for Caloundra’s first residents and holiday makers.

They provided free of charge, essential cold-room storage to the Australian Army garrison stationed in Caloundra during the Second World War – the first line of defence of Australia.

The Clarke Family helped form many of Caloundra’s early community services including the Ambulance, School of Arts and Methodist Church.

In 75 years the Clarke Family have participated in over 50 rescues on the Caloundra Bar. As a result of these actions they have been awarded a citation from the Humane Society of Australia.

Today Evan and Grace Clarke’s descendants continue in the family tradition, fishing Caloundra’s ocean beaches in the winter for export mullet.

Gradorean was the name of a boat used by the Clarke family in their fishing business. It was derived from the names of three of their children, Grace, Doris and Jean.

Gradorean Street

Evan and Grace Clarke and their 9 children settled on the shores of Pumicestone Passage in 1922 where they built Caloundra’s first Ice works, founding a year-round commercial fishing industry and providing much needed ice for Caloundra’s first residents and holiday makers.

They provided free of charge, essential cold-room storage to the Australian Army garrison stationed in Caloundra during the Second World War – the first line of defence of Australia.

The Clarke Family helped form many of Caloundra’s early community services including the Ambulance, School of Arts and Methodist Church.

In 75 years the Clarke Family have participated in over 50 rescues on the Caloundra Bar. As a result of these actions they have been awarded a citation from the Humane Society of Australia.

Today Evan and Grace Clarke’s descendants continue in the family tradition, fishing Caloundra’s ocean beaches in the winter for export mullet.

Gradorean was the name of a boat used by the Clarke family in their fishing business. It was derived from the names of three of their children, Grace, Doris and Jean.

Grasstree Court

Grass Trees (Xanthorrheoa johnsonii) are very slow growing with mature plants being centuries old. Grass Trees only grow in Australia.

These remarkable plants have a lifespan of 600 years but are very slow-growing. The trunk takes a decade to form initially as it is composed of a mass of old leaf bases held together by a natural resin. It is then a further 20 years or more before the mass of thin, linear leaves rises above it. From then on, it grows only about 1-2cm (0.4-0.8in) in height per year. We have observed plants which have taken 27 years to grown 30 centimetres (one foot).

This plant grows to a height of over 4 metres and often has branches. It’s growth rate is only about 1 metre every 100 years. However, the flowering stalk grows at a rate of 2 – 3 cm per day reaching to a height of over 3 metres. Mature plants will result in flowering every 2 – 3 years. The Grass Tree attracts a wide range of lizards and insects that shelter in the plant’s massive foliage. The flowering spear of the plant attracts honey eating birds, bees, ants, and butterflies.

Grenville Street

The HMS Grenville was one of James Cook’s first commands, in which he surveyed the east cost of Canada from 1763 to 1767. These maps were so accurate that they were not superseded until the early 20th Century.

Cook’s next major command was on the H.M.B Endeavour, on its famous voyage of discovery from 1768 to 1771. It was during this voyage, on Thursday 17 May 1770, that Cook (having left Botany Bay some 10 days earlier) sailed along what is now known as the Sunshine Coast. It was at this time that he gave the name the “Glass Houses” to the hinterland’s distinctive volcanic formations.

Harbourlights Way

With views of the harbour lights of Caloundra, the name of this street was inspired by a song called “Harbourlights” by Boz Scaggs.

Hartley Crescent

During the Second World War, the Sunshine Coast was an active training area for Australian and American troops.

Padre Frank Hartley was a well-known personality in the district at this time. The Padre took it upon himself to organise the “Bunfights” (as his Sunday high teas became known) for the benefit of troops camped nearby and, on occasion, American troops in transit. Collecting milk, butter and eggs from local farmers, and tea and bread from the army, he arranged for sandwiches, cakes and tarts to be prepared. The social evenings were then held in the old supper room under the Landsborough Memorial Hall, with the refreshments served by the local ladies and girls.

Hazeldyne Court

Hazel Violet Dyne (nee Brewster) was born in Brisbane on the 9th August 1914. She first holidayed in Caloundra in 1933, and continued to do so for many years. In 1939, Hazel married Fred Dyne, and they had two daughters, Delma and Barbara (there are five grandchildren).

In 1946, Fred and Hazel purchased the land and built a home at No. 14 The Esplanade, Golden Beach. Sadly, Hazel was widowed in 1968. in 1981-82 the home was replaced with what is now the Pumicestone Court units, where Hazel resides.

She was always interested in fishing and boating, and, with her daughters, was deeply involved with the formation of the Caloundra Sailing Club and was also the first official starter and time keeper. Hazel was later honoured with life membership. The club meetings were held at the Dyne residence.

Hazel has a strong and lasting affection for Caloundra and particularly Golden Beach.

She will always be remembered as a kind, generous and gracious lady.

Hereward Street

Hereward Leighton Kesteven (1881 – 1964) A doctor of medicine (B.Sc. D.Sc. M.B. Ch.M. M.D.), and son of a doctor of medicine was born in Fiji. As a young man he worked in the Australian Museum in Sydney for two years and through his life-long interest in conchology and other zoological sciences, he retained his association with that museum throughout his long life.

He collected Mollusca in the Pumicestone Passage in 1902 and the collection he made there, of 373 species, is in the Australian Museum.

He practiced medicine in country districts in New South Wales and Queensland but never lost his interest in natural history, while at the same time developing various other interests such as economics, politics and industrial medicine. During World War Two he worked in Army camps all over Australia.

He died in Brighton, Queensland in 1964, having previously been given an appropriate memorial in having his name given to a genus ” Herewardia”.

Investigator Place

Matthew Flinders (1774 – 1814) navigator, hydrographer and scientist was born at Donington, Lincolnshire. He joined the navy in 1789 and in 1791 served under William Bligh as midshipman on a voyage to Tahiti.

In 1795 he first came to Australia in H.M.S. Reliance in which ship George Bass was the surgeon. With Bass he made several hazardous voyages in open boats, exploring the south coast of New South Wales. In 1798, again in company with Bass he circumnavigated Tasmania, proving it to be an island. In the same sloop, the ” Norfolk” the next year he followed the coastline northwards visiting Moreton Bay, including the Pumicestone Passage.

He was given the command of the “H.M.S. Investigator” in 1801 and for the next two years sailed around the continent of Australia, charting its coastline.

Returning to England as a passenger in H.M.S. Porpoise in 1803, he was wrecked on an island east of the Great Barrier Reef but managed to navigate a cutter more than 700 miles (1120 km) back to Port Jackson. He set off once again for England in a leaky schooner of 29 tons (26 tonnes), the “Cumberland” and in putting in to the French island of Mauritius found war had broken out again between Britain and France, was arrested and held prisoner there for six years. Arriving back in England in 1810 in bad health, he began his monumental task of writing the account of his voyages, which was published on 18 July 1814, the day before he died.

Kalowendha Avenue

Kalowendha: “Place of Beech Trees”

From the local Kabi language ” kal/owen” meaning beech tree and ” dha” to denote place. The genetic name is Gmelina leichhardtii many of which still remain throughout the estate. Local white settlers have adapted the native term ” kal/owen/ dha” for this area which has settled phonetically on the currently.

Koopa Place

From 1860 to 1890 there was notable commercial expansion in Queensland. As this was an era of water transport, the Passage was admirably suitable for development and acquired its first settlers and industry. But then, in 1890 the railway arrived at Landsborough, and water transport for Pumicestone Passage industry was reduced to the minimal.

For some years there ensued another period of almost complete isolation from the world until the Brisbane Tug Company, which began operations in 1903 and subsequently became active throughout Moreton Bay, gave a kiss of life to the southern end of Bribie, especially when the popular ferry ship the ” Koopa” began its service to the island in 1911.

With the improvement of road and the growing popularity of motor transport, the boat ferries lost custom to private car owners who crossed the Passage by barge from the mainland at Toorbul Point to Bongaree. That too was made obsolete when the bridge was built in 1963.

The Koopa, together with the Doomba, Greyhound and Beaver, served with the Brisbane Tug and Steamship Company working Moreton Bay. The Koopa was a 416 ton ship built in Glasgow and had a capacity of 1600 passengers. It commenced a Hamilton – Redcliffe – Bribie Island service in 1912. The Koopa converted to a supply ship in World War 2, serving in New Guinea waters.

Kuthar Street

The “kuthar” was a weapon used by indigenous tribes throughout the region including the local Undambi people. Often referred to as a nulla nulla, author John Matthews describes the Kuthar as … “a club to be thrown or for striking at close quarters. With it they hunted and fought. The heavy end was sometimes rendered more formidable by having a surrounding band of knobs carved in the solid. The kuthar were commonly made of iron-bark, but many were of brigalow…”

Lamerough Parade

In late 1946 Portion 27, which was owned by the Estate of Herbert Hemming and managed by the Public Curator, came on the market. Portion 27 was originally owned by William Landsborough as his “Loch Lamerough” estate, and constitutes the present Pelican Waters development. World War II had ended and Roy Henzell obtained the Agency for this large block. People were starting to settle in Caloundra after discharge from the Armed Forces.

Roy Henzell tried to interest a number of people in purchasing this block and subdividing it but they either did not have sufficient capital or could not see its potential. He realised it would be a good investment and the family – Roy, his wife Maisie, their children Joan (Ford) and Bevan – all put capital into buying it. It has remained a family development ever since.

Lander  Street

The Unoccupied Crown Lands Occupation Act 1860 had opened the area to pastoral runs as well as for timber-getting, and the first person to take advantage of this was a migrant from Devonshire, Edmund Lander. He grazed cattle at Kedron Brook in Brisbane.

Edmund Lander also grazed his cattle on Bribie Island, presumably by holding Occupational Licences on Vacant Crown Land. There is a spot south of the Lighthouse Reserve on the Island known as Landers’ Camp. The cattle were swum across the Passage or walked across at low tide in the more shallow sections. Descendants of Edmund Lander still have cattle on Bribie. Now they are moved in trucks.

Lang Street

The Reverend John Dunmore Lang (1799 – 1878) Presbyterian clergyman, politician and writer was responsible for the presence of the missionaries on the outskirts of the convict colony. When he was in England in 1837 he had arranged with the Home Government for the establishment of a mission to the Aborigines at Moreton Bay. There was already present a German Protestant Chaplain, the Rev. Johann Christian Simon Handt, who was also a missionary to the Aborigines. This new group came under the recently formed Presbyterian Synod of New South Wales of which Dr Lang was Moderator.

The mission comprised of clerical and lay members, who with few exceptions had been trained as missionaries in Germany. Tragically, one of the clerks, who had also been trained in medicine, died of typhus fever at the quarantine station before arrival in Sydney. That left the complement of the staff as one minister of religion, a bricklayer, cabinet-maker, blacksmith, farmer, weaver, tailor, two shoemakers and a gardener, all but the last three having wives. Eleven children accompanied them.

La Rita Court

The La Rita was the boat that plied the waters between Brisbane and Caloundra in the early years of the 20th century. On one trip in 1905 it brought to Caloundra the furniture for Caloundra’s first hotel, Hotel Francis, as well as one of the area’s prominent early settlers, Tom Maloney. The boat also carried freight back down to Brisbane, including Maloney’s “Lighthouse Brand” canned fish between 1906 and 1910. The ship was sold in 1927.

Leach Court

Samuel Leach settled on the land adjoining Bell’s Creek in the Diamond Head area in 1881. In 1887 Leach was issued a Deed of Grant for 40 acres, for the princely sum of ₤1/0/3. An area 150 links wide (30 metres) was not included in this land, as it was to be surveyed for a road or esplanade along the frontage to the Pumicestone Channel. Today this area forms The Esplanade. A petition was initially circulated by Leach, aimed at having this area included in his property. Signatories included notable early settlers of the Caloundra area such as Richard Westaway, William Westaway, William Landsborough, Isaac Burgess and Alfred Delisser. It was claimed that…”the formation of an ‘esplanade’ can never be of any benefit to the public”. Today’s residents are apt to disagree, and can remain thankful that the request was refused.

Leonie Court

“Leonie” Campbell brothers boat. James Campbell and Sons established their sawmill in 1881 at the place that was to become known as Campbellville, near the mouth of Coochin Creek. Sawn timber was then conveyed to Brisbane in the company’s two boats, the Leonie and the Mavis. On the return trip, the boats brought passengers and merchandise for the settlers of the region. It was the Mavis that brought government officials from Brisbane to Caloundra and back again to conduct the first public sale of land in Caloundra on 9 April 1883.

Lockyer Place

The story of timber-getting in the environs of the Passage begins with Major Edmund Lockyer, one of the explorers of the Brisbane River. In 1825, when tracing the course of the Brisbane River, was on its tributary the Stanley River just over the D’Aguilar Range to the west of the Pumice Stone River. (as the passage was called at that time) He judged the timbers in the hinterland as:

Ludwig Place

Scholar, naturalist and explorer was born in Prussia. At universities of Berlin and Gottingen he first studied philosophy and languages before switching to medical science. In England later, he studied medical and natural science at the Royal College of Surgeons and the British Museum. In Paris, he studied further natural science at the Jardin des Plantes, while at the same time spending much time on field work both in England and European countries.

From 1842 he began moving through the country, studying and collecting specimens for European museums. During 1842 to 1844 he continued his field studies in the Moreton Bay district, visiting the Pumicestone Passage in company with his hosts the Archer brothers of ” Durundur” Station, on the Stanley River

In 1844 Leichhardt set off from Moreton Bay with a private exploratory expedition to cross the continent to Port Essington. This remarkable performance he achieved with the loss of only one life, that of John Gilbert the ornithologist who was speared by Aboriginals on the Gulf of Carpentaria at the river subsequently named after him. The journey of 3000 miles (5000 km) through unknown territory was accomplished in fifteen months. On returning to Sydney by sea he was given a hero’s welcome. Using the money which had been subscribed by the public as a gift for him, he organised a second extensive expedition which ended in miserable failure after proceeding only 500 miles (800 km). Re-organised, he set off once again, planning to cross the continent from the Darling Downs to the west coast. This party completely disappeared and their fate has never been satisfactorily solved.

Mahogany Drive

Mahogany Drive is named after the swamp mahogany (Eucalyptus robusta) which is endemic to Pelican Waters. The Swamp Mahogany (Eucalyptus robusta) is a prolific Winter flowering tree that provides a good supply of nectar at a time of year when there are few other such resources for the many species which require such a diet.

Maloney Place

Boatman, oysterman and fish-cannery owner was born in Normanton, North Queensland in 1889. As a teenager Thomas Maloney first came to the Pumicestone Passage to live in a bark hut on the northern tip of Bribie Island in 1905.

Through most of his life, he traded for the family fish-cannery business of Maloney Bros., which operated between Brisbane and Caloundra. In the early days he was dealing in crabs, fish and oysters. In the later years his barge left Caloundra to return to Brisbane laden with bags of shell-grit from his shell-grit leases Caloundra’s beaches.

Tom Maloney was much loved by the local children to whom he gave rides on his horse-drawn sled between the beach and his old truck.

His retirement was spent in Caloundra where he died in September 1976.

Maranoa Lane

‘Waterside’ precinct road names were founded on Queensland rivers.

Marina View Drive

Located with views to the future Pelican Waters marina.

Matthew Crescent

Matthew Flinders (1774 – 1814) navigator, hydrographer and scientist was born at Donington, Lincolnshire. He joined the nay in 1789 and in 1791 served under William Bligh as midshipman on a voyage to Tahiti.

In 1795 he first came to Australia in H.M.S. Reliance in which ship George Bass was the surgeon. In 1798, again in company with Bass he circumnavigated Tasmania, proving it to be an island. In the same sloop, the ” Norfolk” the next year he followed the coastline northwards visiting Moreton Bay, including the Pumicestone Passage.

On 12 th July 1799, Flinders dropped anchor at what he called ” Glasshouse Bay” and on 16 th July 1799 he entered Pumicestone Passage and called it ” Pumicestone River” because of all the pumicestone floating on the edge. He climbed Mount Beerburrum on 26 th July 1799. Flinders and his party camped at the foot of Mt Tibrogargan, where the railway bridge crosses the creek.

Arriving back in England in 1810 in bad health, he began his monumental task of writing the account of his voyages, which was published on 18 July 1814, the day before he died.

Meston Court

Archibald Meston (1851 – 1924) journalist and administrator, was born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. His family migrated to Australia in 1859 and farmed at Ulmarra on the Clarence River in New South Wales.

Meston became Manager of a Brisbane River sugar plantation in 1874. He contributed articles to the Queenslander and from 1876 to 1881 he edited the Ipswich Observer, which became the Brisbane Daily Observer in 1879. He represented Rosewood in the Legislative Assembly (1878 – 1882), and after spending six months of 1881 as editor of the Townsville Herald he was cane- farming on the Barron River for eight years.

He was commissioned in 1894 to prepare plans for improving conditions for Aborigines which became the basis for the “Aboriginal Protection Act of 1895” and the following year he was appointed Protector of Aborigines for South Queensland.

Meston published a Geographic History of Queensland (1895) as a text-book for Queensland schools. For a time he was director of the Queensland Government Tourist Bureau in Sydney. He died in Brisbane in 1924.

Midden Place

Shellfish were an important part of the Aboriginal diet. The huge deposits of discarded shells from the shellfish were called “middens“. These middens contain shells of a number of species, some so small one cannot help but wonder why they were worth opening.

There are at least fifty-eight middens registered as archaeological sites along the Pumicestone Passage. One midden that was found in February 1977 was found on the north shore of Bells Creek almost hidden by the growth of large trees and shrubs and long grass, and the top of the midden was covered by about ten centimetres of topsoil, the accumulation of over one hundred years.

Millenium Circuit

Commemorates both the dawn of the new millennium and the 2000 Sydney Olympics. We honour the dedication and achievements of Australia’s Olympic and Paralympic teams, officials and volunteers.

New Holland Drive

From the early 1600s, Dutch explorers including Willem Janszoon, Jan Carstensz, Dirk Harthog and Abel Tasman charted much of the coastline of the land they called New Holland. Further extensive mapping of the east coast was undertaken by Lt. James Cook during his first “voyage of discovery” (1768-1771) aboard H.M.B Endeavour. On 22 August 1770, Cook claimed possession of the entire eastern coast of New Holland in the name of King George III, naming the colony New South Wales. It was not until 1824 that the name Australia, as suggested by Matthew Flinders, was officially adopted for the continent.

Ningi Court

Oystering came naturally with such an abundance of supply in the Pumicestone Passage in the early 1800’s. In September 1843, Ludwig Leichhardt with his hosts John and David Archer spent a couple of days with their friends the Nynga Nynga Aboriginal people at Durval (the Ningi Aboriginal people at Toorbul) feasting on oysters and crabs to which Leichhardt gave high praise. Ningi is the Aboriginal word for oysters.

While there is not the abundance of oysters in the Passage today that existed last century, the records show there are thirty-four areas currently under license as oyster banks in it’s waters.

The majority of these are worked only in a desultory fashion although there are good stocks of oysters on the more suitable banks. Most of the licensed banks have been in existence for a great number of years – in some instances since the early 1900’s.

Norfolk Court

In 1799 Matthew Flinders was given command of the Sloop ” Norfolk” and instructed to explore the Glasshouse and Hervey Bays, two large openings to the north, which were the only two entrances known at the time.

Flinders, writing in his journal commented:

“I had some hope of finding a considerable river discharging itself at one of these openings, and of being able by its means to penetrate further into the interior of the country than had hitherto been effected.”

After exploring the southern part of Moreton Bay, he returned to the Pumicestone River and while a leak in the ” Norfolk” was being repaired on the beach we now
know as White Patch, Flinders and a few of his men took a boat up the Passage and into Glass Mountain Creek, from where they walked to the Glasshouses, climbing Beerburrum but failing to climb Tibrogargan.

Olympic Lane

Commemorates both the dawn of the new millennium and the 2000 Sydney Olympics. We honour the dedication and achievements of  Australia’s Olympic and Paralympic teams, officials and volunteers.

Oxford Parade

Oxford’s Pitt Rivers Museum houses one of the world’s great collections of 18th century Pacific island art and cultural artifacts, collected during James Cook’s second voyage of discovery (1772-1775), during which he and his crew discovered many of the Tuamouto, Society, Tongan, and Fijian islands.

On this voyage, Cook was accompanied by Johann Reinhold Forster and his son George Adam Forster, appointed “at the King’s pleasure” naturalists to the expedition. At the conclusion of the journey their extensive collections and notes were forwarded directly to Oxford University’s Vice Chancellor Thomas Fothergill.

Pamphlet Place

Richard Parsons, Thomas Pamphlet and John Finnegan were ticket-of-leave convicts who were travelling south from Sydney to the Illawarra district to buy cedar, when they were caught in a storm and eventually wrecked on the shore of Moreton Island in 1823.

They spent five months travelling by canoe up the Brisbane River (un-named at the time), and then to Bribie Island where the Aborigines supplied them with fish and showed them how to dig for, treat and cook fern roots.

After a time, anxious to get back to Sydney, they set off north again, but Pamphlet and Finnegan returned and Parsons kept going. Two months later in November of the year of 1823, Pamphlet and Finnegan were rescued by John Oxley in the “Mermaid”. Parsons had to wait another year for his rescue, until Oxley returned.

Parsons Close

Richard Parsons, Thomas Pamphlet and John Finnegan were ticket-of-leave convicts who were travelling south from Sydney to the Illawarra district to buy cedar, when they were caught in a storm and eventually wrecked on the shore of Moreton Island in 1823.

They spent five months travelling by canoe up the Brisbane River (un-named at the time), and then to Bribie Island where the Aborigines supplied them with fish and showed them how to dig for, treat and cook fern roots.

After a time, anxious to get back to Sydney, they set off north again, but Pamphlet and Finnegan returned and Parsons kept going. Two months later in November of the year of 1823, Pamphlet and Finnegan were rescued by John Oxley in the “Mermaid”. Parsons had to wait another year for his rescue, until Oxley returned.

Pelican Waters Blvd

The suburb now known as Pelican Waters was given to William Landsborough under a Deed of Grant for services to the state of Queensland on the 17th October 1881. He called his selection Loch Lamerough.

William Landsborough was the first explorer to cross Australia from north to south while searching for the ill fated Burke and Wills expedition.
After his death in 1886 the land was purchased by Herbert Hemming in 1900.

Roy and Maysie Henzells bought the parcel on the 10th January 1946. Since then, the Henzell family have continually developed it firstly as Golden Beach and now as Pelican Waters. The name of Pelican Waters was inspired by the abundance of pelicans, which are still to be seen today in large numbers.

Pembroke Avenue

In March 1768 the 368-ton bark Earl of Pembroke was purchased by the Royal Navy, refitted, and given the name H.M.B Endeavour. Lt. James Cook commanded the ship on its expedition to Tahiti to observe the 1769 transit of Venus across the sun. It was on this voyage (1768-1771) that Cook mapped, landed on and claimed, in the name of King George III, the entire eastern part of the Australian continent.

After Cook’s voyage the Endeavour became a store-ship, making three journeys to the Falkland Islands. The Royal Navy sold the Endeavour in 1775 for ₤645, and she then served as a collier in the North Sea. In 1790, Captain William Hayden of Massachusetts bought the Endeavour as a whaling ship, registering her under French colours as La Liberte. In 1793 she ran aground in Newport and was subsequently sold off and broken up.

Quayline Close

A quay line is a place to moor a boat, much like a pontoon.

Raptor Place

Only two species of bird of prey (raptor) have world wide distributions. They are the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) and Osprey (Pandion Haliaetus). Ospreys are found worldwide, with the exception of South America and the Pacific Islands. In Australia, they can be found mainly in coastal areas or in the vicinity of large areas of permanent water over most of the continent. However, Ospreys are absent or rarely encountered in Tasmania and Victoria.

Ospreys are usually seen singly, in pairs or family groups. They favour marine habitats such as mangroves, estuaries, bays, inlets and islands. Ospreys can also be seen in the vicinity of extensive permanent fresh water such as dams, lakes, streams and swamps. Their diet consists mainly of fish which are caught near the surface or plunging below the surface of the water. In addition to fish, Ospreys will also take small vertebrates, seabirds, and crustaceans. Like all raptors, ospreys catch their prey with specialised grasping feet and talons.

The nesting season is determined by weather conditions and food availability. In tropical and subtropical areas, Ospreys may nest twice a year if conditions are suitable but a single nesting in the June-December period is the norm in cooler regions. Their nests are substantial structures built of sticks and driftwood, lined with fibrous material such as bark and seaweed. Pairs mate for life and return to the same nest site each season. Some nest sites have been in use by generations of Ospreys and large accumulations (up to 2-3 metres high) have resulted from successive additions of nesting material.

Reliance Close

In 1795 Matthew Flinders (1774 – 1814) first came to Australia in H.M.S. Reliance in which ship George Bass was the surgeon. With Bass he made several hazardous voyages in open boats, exploring the south coast of New South Wales. In 1798, again in company with Bass he circumnavigated Tasmania, proving it to be an island. In the sloop the ” Norfolk” the next year he followed the coastline northwards visiting Moreton Bay, including Pumicestone Passage.

On 12 th July 1799, Flinders dropped anchor at what he called ” Glasshouse Bay” and on 16 th July 1799 he entered Pumicestone Passage and called it ” Pumicestone River” because of all the pumicestone floating on the edge. He climbed Mount Beerburrum on 26 th July 1799. Flinders and his party camped at the foot of Mt Tibrogargan, where the railway bridge crosses the creek.

Resolution Street

James Cook was in 1772 promoted to Commander and given command of the 110 foot collier Resolution. Together with the Adventure, the ship’s mission was to search for a seventh continent in the vast unexplored southern oceans. Sailing into the Antarctic Ocean as far as the pack ice allowed, Cook was unable to confirm the existence of any land mass. Later in this voyage (1772-1775) Cook discovered many of the Tuamouto, Society, Tongan, and Fijian islands.

Again sailing aboard Resolution in 1776, Cook sought the so-called “Northwest passage” around the North American continent. Thwarted by ice in the Arctic Ocean, the Resolution sailed south to the Sandwich (Hawaiian) Islands for a month of rest, repairs and replenishment. Departing to continue the Northwest Passage mission, the Resolution was soon damaged in a storm and forced to return to the Sandwich Islands. There, on 14 February 1779 in Kealakekua Bay, a dispute broke out with local inhabitants and Cook was killed. The Resolution returned to England in August 1780.

Rutherford Place

At 4.10am on 14 May 1943 the Australian Hospital Ship Centaur was torpedoed and sunk by the Japanese submarine I-177 off Moreton Island. Only 64 of 322 on board survived. Sister Eileen Rutherford was one of the victims. Of the twelve nursing staff on board, only one, Sister Ellen Savage, survived. She and the remaining survivors were rescued by the ship USS Mugford some 36 hours later.

This street is dedicated to the memory of Sister Rutherford and all those lost on the Centaur, whose names are recorded on the Centaur Memorial, Wickham Point, Caloundra.

Scartree Street

When a road was surveyed in 1881 by surveyor Alfred Delisser, a permanent survey mark was carved in the trunk of a tree on the southern end of the course, hence the name “Scartree”.

The tree is still standing in Campbellville Circuit. The region was again surveyed in 1995.

Schnappering Close

Thomas Welsby (1858-1941) was keenly aware of history being made and of the importance of recording it, which he did in his book “Schnappering” published in 1905. An extract from his book describes Caloundra as follows:

“…we must give all places a chance, and in good time Caloundra will be amongst the described places. One of the prettiest – if not the prettiest – of watering places Brisbane possesses, for it is not so very far away that citizens of the metropolis are debarred from visiting it.

The majority of Caloundra is in the hands of two men. These two men of different characters who having obtained beautiful land in many acres merely sat down and enjoyed the knowledge of their possession. According to Thomas Welsby Caloundra could be made one of the prettiest places for a seaside resort. The man who buys, must not sit down on his haunches and wait. He must be up and doing, must be energetic, help on building, help on progress and where acres of land now almost valueless exist, corner allotments would be sought after and worth ownership.”

Sea Glint Place

Sea Glint was one of, if not the, first guest houses in Caloundra, this one being owned and operated by John Wilson at Wilson’s Lake, now Tooway Lake at Moffat Beach. The Queensland Premier, Lord Lamington, stayed at this guest house during a tour in 1896. Other guests included Sir Thomas McIlwraith, Sir Arthur Hunter Palmer and Boyd Dunlop Morehead.

Silky Oak Place

Grevillea robusta (Silky Oak), is the largest tree of the Grevillea family (200 species of trees and shrubs that are mainly native to Australia and near Pacific islands). Produces sawn timber of medium strength that is used for furniture, packing cases, flooring, paneling, and plywood.

It’s original distribution is a coastal region of southern Queensland down to northern New South Wales – as far inland as the western slopes of the Great Dividing range.

Foliage is large, deep green and fern-like (whitish beneath). It is a fast growing tree that has been grown in many countries around the world – for both its timber and flower (around November & December horizontal clusters of fiery orange mass in the branches).

Silky Oaks are native to Pelican Waters.

Sir Joseph Banks Drive

Joseph Banks was born in 1743, the only son of a wealthy land-owning family. From an early age, his declared passion was natural history, and in particular, botany. Shortly after inheriting his family’s fortune in the early 1760’s he chose to pursue this passion to the full. In 1766 he travelled to Newfoundland and Labrador to collect plants, animals and rocks and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in the same year.

When the Royal Society was successful in initiating Captain Cook’s 1768 expedition to Tahiti for astronomical observations, Banks obtained permission from the Admiralty to join the venture. For him, this was like a present-day scientist being given the chance of a trip to another planet, a chance to study new plants in unknown lands.

They made collections and observations in South America, Tahiti and New Zealand before reaching Australia. His major landfalls on the eastern coast of Australia were at Botany Bay (28 April – 5 May 1770) and at the Endeavour River (17 June – 3 August). By now the ‘collection of plants was . . . grown so immensely large that it was necessary that some extraordinary care should be taken of them least they should spoil . . .’

The plant material collected and sorted on the voyage was extensive, with the herbarium specimens accounting for about 110 new genera and 1300 new species.

After his triumphant return from this voyage, Banks travelled to Scotland, Wales, Holland and Iceland, collecting more and more ‘curiosities’. Among a host of other activities, including the running of his estates, he controlled the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and was a Trustee of the British Museum. In 1778 he also became President of the Royal Society, an office which he held until his death in 1820. He was knighted in 1781.

Although Linnaeus’ suggestion of naming the new country ‘Banksia’ was not adopted, Bank’s name was bestowed upon a genus of Australian plants and he made his mark upon Australian history in other ways. When the British government was casting about for a suitable place to establish a penal colony, Banks was an advocate for Botany Bay. After the settlement was established at Sydney Cove, he encouraged further investigation of the natural history of the area and became the acknowledged authority on matters relating to New South Wales. His impact on the study of natural history in both Britain and Australia cannot be overestimated.

Solander Street

Dr Daniel Solander was born in Sweden in 1733. He was appointed as a scientific assistant to Joseph Banks on Cook’s voyage on the Endeavour (1768-1771). He was later secretary and librarian to Joseph Banks. He died in 1782.

Sovereign Circuit

The ship Sovereign was lost in heavy seas and with considerable loss of life at South Passage on March 11, 1847. Subsequent to this tragedy, amid calls for a lighthouse to be built at the northern end of Moreton Bay, marine surveyor and Brisbane police magistrate Captain John Charles Wickham charted the area. He bestowed the Caloundra area’s first name, Wickham Point, at this time.

However, many more wrecks were to occur before the first lighthouse was built at Cape Moreton in 1857.

Stephen Burton Way

Stephen Henry David Burton was born in Landsborough in 1894, and after moving to Albion, Brisbane and attending Windsor State School joined the Citizen Force (militia) and worked in Lakey Brothers’ Sawmill in Beaudesert. Within days of the outbreak of the First World War, he enlisted and became an original member of the 9th (Qld) Battalion. His service record notes:

A steady sober lad … he joined the 9th Battalion and left the shores of Queensland in the “Omrah” on September 24, 1914. He belonged to a military family hence he needed no second ‘call’ to take him to his colours.

The 9th Battalion was part of the first ANZAC landing party to set foot on the Gallipoli peninsula at dawn on April 25, 1915. Less than one month later, on 20 May 1915, Stephen was amongst 160 Australians killed following the Turkish counter attack at Gaba Tepe. He was just 20 years and 11 months old.

Stingray Harbour Court

From the early 1600s, Dutch explorers including Willem Janszoon, Jan Carstensz, Dirk Harthog and Abel Tasman charted much of the coastline of the land they called New Holland. Further extensive mapping of the east coast was undertaken by Lt. James Cook during his first “voyage of discovery” (1768-1771) aboard H.M.B Endeavour. On 22 August 1770, Cook claimed possession of the entire eastern coast of New Holland in the name of King George III, naming the colony New South Wales. It was not until 1824 that the name Australia, as suggested by Matthew Flinders, was officially adopted for the continent.

Stirling Castle Ct

The brig “Stirling Castle” left Sydney for Singapore in May 1836 and was wrecked on some of the barrier reefs bear the entrance to the Torres Straits six days after she sailed.

The whole crew got off, eleven in the long boat and seven in the pinnace. The pinnace sailed away and was not seen again.

In the long boat were Captain Fraser, his wife Eliza, two mates and seven hands, who sailed southward for about two weeks until they were forced to beach it twenty miles south of Sandy Cape to find water.

Two of the crew drowned and Captain Fraser was killed in a skirmish.

The newly widowed Mrs Fraser and remaining crew proceeded along the beaches from tried to tribe finally arriving at Brieby’s Island (now Briby Island) where they were rescued by Lieutenant Otter on 11th August 1836.

Fraser Island was named after Eliza Fraser.

Sydney Avenue

On 9 November 1914 the light cruiser HMAS Sydney engaged the German raider SMS Emden off the Cocos Island. The Sydney inflicted severe damage on the Emden, forcing the crew to drive the ailing ship onto North Keeling Island Reef.

The Sydney served on after the War, including a period as Australia’s flagship. In 1929 she was scrapped. Her 6 inch naval guns were salvaged and in 1940 transferred on Reg Sallaway’s International Truck to the newly constructed Bribie Fort. Together with the Moreton Island installation (also using the Sydney’s guns), these forts served out the Second World War providing protection over the northern entry to Moreton Bay.

Sylvie Street

A party of three young men were swept to their death off the mouth of the Passage near Caloundra. Vern Carseldine’s boat etc and their story is on Picture Sunshine Coast database under Sylvie. There was a cross commemorating the loss of these young men on the sandhills on the northern tip of Bribie but stories have it, was taken down during WW2 for fear it would identify/lead the enemy.

The Corso

In late 1946 Portion 27, which was owned by the Estate of Herbert Hemming and managed by the Public Curator, came on the market. Portion 27 was originally owned by William Landsborough as his ” Loch Lamerough” estate, and constitutes the present Pelican Waters development. World War II had ended and Roy Henzell obtained the Agency for this large block. People were starting to settle in Caloundra after discharge from the Armed Forces.

Roy Henzell tried to interest a number of people in purchasing this block and subdividing it but they either did not have sufficient capital or could not see its potential. He realised it would be a good investment and the family – Roy, his wife Maisie, their children Joan (Ford) and Bevan – all put capital into buying it. It has remained a family development ever since.

The Passage

“The Passage” draws its reference from the iconic Pumicestone Passage.

“The Passage” has a long history. The Gubbi Gubbi people were considered some of the healthiest Aborigines ever seen. No doubt the Passage played an important part in the well being of local indigenous groups as an abundant source of food.

“The Passage” was first recorded by Joseph Banks on 17 May 1770 and followed by Mathew Flinders in 1792. The Passage was then, as it is now, an icon for the Caloundra district.

The PPD14 island precinct is the last development precinct for Pumicestone Passage Development company. The island will be a jewel in the crown of the Pelican Waters Development befitting of a street name such as “The Passage”. The island will be accessed by a bridge structure which essentially forms a passageway to the island. Furthermore the island also represents a right of passage or milestone as the last precinct in the northern half of the Pelican Waters Development.

Tibrogargan Place

Glass House Mountains with its distinctive peaks, ranging in height from 100 to 556 metres, have fascinated explorers, settlers and more recently, holiday visitors. Gradual weathering by wind and rain has produced these spectacular remains of volcanic activity more than 20 million years ago.

The Glass House Mountains were named by Captain James Cook, who thought they resembled the glass foundries near his Yorkshire home, but more importantly they stand as a timeless reminder of Kabi Aborigines, for whom they had enormous Dreamtime significance.

These mountains have a much older and more fascinating tradition in the Dreamtime – known locally as “The Legend of the Glasshouse Mountains”; the story goes as follows:

“It seems that Tibrogargan, the father and Beerwah the mother, had many children – Coonowrin (the eldest), Beerburrum, the Tunbubudla twins, Coochin, Ngungun, Tibberoowuccum, Miketeebumulgrai and Elimbah.

One day, Tibrogargan was gazing out to sea when he noticed a great rising of the waters. Hurrying off to gather his younger children in order to flee to the safety of the mountains, which lay to the west, he called out to Coonoowrin to help his mother, who was again with child. Looking back to see how Coonoowrin was assisting Beerwah, Tibrogargan was greatly angered to see him running off alone. He pursued Coonoowrin and, raising his club, struck the latter such a mighty blow that it dislocated Coonoowrin’s neck and he was never able to straighten it since.

When the floods subsided and the family returned to the plains, the other children teased Coonoowrin about his crooked neck. Feeling ashamed, Coonoowrin went to Tibrogargan and asked for forgiveness, but filled with shame at his son’s cowardice, Tibrogargan could do nothing but weep copious tears, which trickling along the ground, formed a stream which flowed into the sea. Then Coonoowrin went to his brothers and sisters, but they also wept at the shame of their brother’s cowardice.

The lamentations of Coonoowrin’s parents and his brothers and sisters at his disgrace explain the presence, to this day, of the numerous small streams of the area. Tibrogargan then called Coonoowrin, asking him why he had deserted Beerwah; at which Coonoowrin replied that as Beerwah was the biggest of them all she should be able to take care of herself. He did not know that Beerwah was again pregnant, which was the reason for her great size. Then Tibrogargan turned his back on Coonoowrin and vowed that he would never look at him again.

Even today, Tibrogargan gazes far out to sea and never looks around at Coonoowrin, who hangs his head and cries, his tears running off to the sea. His mother Beerwah is still heavy with child – it takes a long, long time to give birth to a mountain.”

Tilney Street

The Tilney’s were pioneers from Conondale but were well known in Caloundra too. Tilneys are listed in the 1900 Post Office Directory living permanently in Caloundra under farming and grazing. Tilney’s guesthouse was one business which operated a service vehicle to ferry guests to and from Landsborough Rail.

Ray Tilney was a much loved member and character of Caloundra’s society and transported goods by barge including the original gun from the ill-fated Sydney (the Sydney had been refitted with new ordnance). Ray took it to Bribie Battery during WW2.

Toorbul Street

Fishing, both professional and amateur has always been a feature of life on the Passage. So bountiful were the supplies in the early days of settlement, several fish canneries were established at different times and in different places between the late 1890s and 1914.

The first of these were at “Toorbul Point“, a business owned by Messrs. James Clark and Reginald Hockings. This was sold to Charles Godwin in 1899 and shifted to the northern tip of Bribie soon afterwards. While it was still in operation, Maloney Bros. erected a second cannery right alongside it in 1906. The following year Godwin sold out to Lionel Landsborough, son of William Landsborough.

In 1910 it changed ownership again having been bought by Mrs Sarah Balls, who shifted it back to the southern end of the island, opposite to where it was originally established. It was operating there until 1914.

Toorbul came from the name of a locality group of the Yugarabul nation. This group inhabited the area covered by the present cities of Brisbane and Redcliffe, the Shire of Pine Rivers and part of Caloundra Shire. From Yugarabul “tar/au” meaning loose stones and “bul” meaning a population group or subdivision.

Toorbul Point marked Yugarabul nation’s limit of their territory

The idea of Toorbul Point being used as a port appears a quite few times in the mid-1800s. First Dr Lang, then Alexander Archer, later William Landsborough and then during the Second World War by the United States Defense Forces who investigated Toorbul Point as a possible site for a port because they were frustrated by the tedious four-hour journey from the entrance to Moreton Bay to the wharves in Brisbane.

Tooringoor Close

Tooringoor Creek is the original name of Bell’s Creek. Whilst it is believed that the location of the creek was known to oyster gatherers and timber getters from the 1850s, few people ventured into the area, purportedly on account of the fierce reputation of the Bribie Island aborigines. However, in 1865 Alexander Archer (of the Archer family from Durundur Station near today’s Woodford) explored Tooringoor Creek more fully, his interest in the Caloundra area stimulated by the tale of the castaways from the Queen of the Colonies in 1863.

The origin of the name Bell’s Creek has not been accurately detailed, however McArthur, in her book Pumicestone Passage – a living waterway, suggests that it may have been named after A.M.A Bell, who in 1882 took out the lease on 734 acres on the southern side of the mouth of the creek.

Tripcony Court

Thomas Martin Tripcony (1828 – 1896) sailor, shearer, oysterman was born in Cornwall, England. He served in the Royal Navy during the Crimean War and later joined the merchant marine. When serving in the ship ” Agincourt” he arrived in Melbourne in 1859, obtained a discharge and went to the goldfields, but failed to make a fortune. He next tried shearing and worked his way to Brisbane where he was employed on the construction of the Normal School.

In Brisbane in 1861, he married Catherine Buchanan (1835 – 1903) and went to work for Captain Whish on his sugar plantation on the Caboolture River plain.

From Caboolture he moved on to Deception Bay, lime-burning for James Campbell and Sons, and moved from there to Toorbul Point and finally to Cowiebank, where he obtained an oyster licence and took up land and settled for the remainder of his life – oystering. He died in 1896.

Tweddell Drive

CSM Arthur Reginald Tweddell (Distinguished Conduct Medal, Military Medal and Bar) was a Foundation Member of the Caloundra RSL. He served with distinction in the 15th and 47th Battalions in France and Belgium during World War 1. His citation for the Distinguished Conduct Medal reads:

During attack on final objective East of Messines on June 7, 1917, a party was specially called for to attack an enemy strong point. Corpl. TWEDDELL volunteered to lead it and reached it first. Without waiting to see if any others were with him, he charged the nearest German, killed him, and so demoralized the others that 17 Germans surrendered to Corporal TWEDDELL’S party.

Tytherleigh Lane

Mr. John Tytherleigh was the first Chairman of the Landsborough Shire Council (now the Caloundra City Council), which met initially on April 12, 1912 at Dyer’s Hall, Landsborough. The original purpose-built shire chambers were opened in 1924 in Landsborough. Use of this building continued until 1968 when Caloundra, as the shire’s fastest growing town, became home to the new Council chambers on the corner of Bulcock Street and Otranto Avenue (now the post office).

Undanbi Place

Although there is considerable debate about the names and boundaries of the tribes of the district, Norman Tindale’s book Aboriginal Tribes of Australia establishes that the Undanbi tribe originally inhabited the Golden Beach area as part of a 10-mile wide coastal strip from Noosa Heads to the mouth of the Brisbane River. Tindale located the Kabi Kabi tribe to the west of this, the Ningi Ningi people as being from Toorbul Point, and the Joondoburri people (or Ngunda according to Tom Petrie) as being from Bribie Island.

John Mathew M.A., B.D. an academic anthropologist, who lived in Kabi territory as a teenage youth for more than six consecutive years. He visited the tribe periodically afterwards and spoke their language as a “second mother-tongue” knew many Aboriginal tribes and made a lifelong study of their lore and their laws.

In his book published in 1910 the coastal tribes ranged along the coast from 16 kilometres inland and from Noosa to the mouth of the Brisbane River. He called this place “Undanbi”, which meant “man”. Then he located the Aboriginal tribe Kabi Kabi to the west of the Undanbi.

Venus Street

The purpose of Cook’s first voyage (1768-1771) in the H.M.B Endeavour, sponsored by the Royal Society of London, was to observe from Tahiti the transit of Venus across the sun. It was during this voyage that Cook was able to confirm and improve the mapping and knowledge of the Australian continent (then New Holland) gained by Tasman and Dampier in the 17th Century. Cook claimed the entire eastern coast of the continent in the name of King George III, and named the colony New South Wales.

Wallum Close

Little has been left of our wildflower heritage on the mainland shore although there is still enough to enable the creation of some small pocket reserves.

Callistemon pachyphyllus is a small to medium sized shrub, usually reaching around 1 metre in height. Its common name comes from the sandy, coastal heath habitat, which is known as “Wallum Bottlebrush”.

Although not widely cultivated, Callistemon pachyphyllus is a hardy plant under a wide range of garden conditions. The “bottlebrush” flower spikes appear in late spring and are usually red in colour. The green flowered form is the variety viridis, which is found throughout the range of the species.

Waterhen Court

In the late 1930’s, Thomas Maloney and his brother owned a flat bottom barge called the ” Waterhen”. It was made flat bottom, so it could float over the shallow sandbanks in the Pumicestone Passage. It took shellgrit to Brisbane to a wharf at Newstead. The shellgrit was bagged and sent to poultry farmers on the Darling Downs.

The ” Waterhen” returned with cargo for Caloundra – potatoes, petrol, flour, beer, kerosene, sugar, tea, furniture, timber and iron. All goods were changed about 3 times to other barges because part of Pumicestone Passage is so shallow that the barge couldn’t pass. The shallow part is called the Skids – still today.

Webb Ellis Court

Webb Ellis Cup – Legend has it that the game of Rugby Union originated at a school in Rugby, a township in England (hence the name). One of the pupils, William Webb Ellis, picked up the ball during a game of soccer in 1823 and ran with it. Of course the story is most likely apocryphal, since games involving running with a “ball” in hand had existed for centuries before that. At any rate William Webb Ellis’s deed is commemorated by a stone on the Rugby school grounds with the inscription:

“This stone commemorates the exploits of William Webb Ellis who with a fine disregard for the rules of football, as played in his time, first took the ball in his arms and ran with it, thus originating the distinctive features of The Rugby Game – A.D. 1823”

The Australian Rugby Team, The Wallabies, were based in Golden Beach when they won the Webb Ellis Cup, the symbol of supremacy in world Rugby.

Whitby Place

James Cook was born in a cottage in Marton-in-Cleveland on 27th of October 1728. While still a child, Cook moved with his family to a farm near Great Ayton, nestled beneath the majestic Roseberry Topping.

The land was owned by the benevolent Lord of the Manor, Thomas Skottowe, who soon noticed the bright young farmer’s son, and arranged for him to go to the local village school, where he quickly showed an aptitude for mathematics. Cook spent his latter childhood years labouring on his father’s farm, before at the age of sixteen he was apprenticed at a shop in Staithes, owned by William Sanderson.

Nestling beneath the cliff’s ten miles from Whitby, Staithes was at that time a thriving fishing town with a thousand inhabitants. It was probably in this town, which lived and breathed boats and the sea, that Cook first conceived the idea of joining the navy. It was certainly here that he learned the rudiments of Navigation. Quickly discovering that a life behind a shop counter was not for him, Cook told Sanderson that he wished to go to sea. He was then introduced to John Walker, and came to Whitby.

He found there a busy sea port, full of industry and toil, where all aspects of shipbuilding were practiced. The harbour was forever awash with maritime traffic, and there was always many a sail to view from the pier. Walker was a Quaker and his family owned several ships, as well as a house on Grape Lane where Cook is said to have slept, and which now houses the Cook Museum. Cook soon began to show his abilities as a seaman.